1. Online sessions are free to access and extremely valuable for EFL teachers interested in keeping up with current trends in research. Dave Huxtable gives an excellent presentation on China’s progress since implementing 2001 curriculum reforms .

     
  2. theteachersdesk:

10 Quick and Easy Differentiation Strategies 
I found this on a classroom wall yesterday while supplying and I thought it was a great little reminder of the ways you can differentiate instruction while teaching. 
Start working as a team to identify the resources necessary to support all student needs.
Provide choice.
Vary materials - match texts to readers.
Group and re-group for different purposes.
Build in movement (e.g., transitions, drama responses, etc.).
Use graphic organizers to help students organize their thinking
Provide visual cues (e.g., anchor charts, use colour and font to highlight information, etc.).
Provide auditory cues (e.g., routine instructions, transition music, etc.).
Build in extra practice. 
Adjust the pacing of instruction. Provide extra time to complete tasks. 

    theteachersdesk:

    10 Quick and Easy Differentiation Strategies 

    I found this on a classroom wall yesterday while supplying and I thought it was a great little reminder of the ways you can differentiate instruction while teaching. 

    1. Start working as a team to identify the resources necessary to support all student needs.
    2. Provide choice.
    3. Vary materials - match texts to readers.
    4. Group and re-group for different purposes.
    5. Build in movement (e.g., transitions, drama responses, etc.).
    6. Use graphic organizers to help students organize their thinking
    7. Provide visual cues (e.g., anchor charts, use colour and font to highlight information, etc.).
    8. Provide auditory cues (e.g., routine instructions, transition music, etc.).
    9. Build in extra practice. 
    10. Adjust the pacing of instruction. Provide extra time to complete tasks. 
     
  3. I’ve been living a lie!

     
  4. Classroom tested Language games for large classes.  Also interested in this nugget:

    Should games always have a pedagogical value? No. Especially not the ones that you use as energy burners and to get students’ brains working in English at the start of a class. Games can also be rewards for good work. No English? No game!

    I agree.  What do you think?

     
  5. 
“Hangman is of very dubious pedagogical value IMHO, it uses an inordinate amount of time to focus on single words.
Far better is Board Boggle in which you draw a 5x5 grid on the board with letters ellicited from students (be sure to be tactical and abitrarily stick a few vowels in there) or you can make your own up if time is short.In 2’s-3’s Students have 10-15 minutes to find as many words as they can…Words can be found in the grid by following chains in any direction vertically. horizontally or diagonally, using each letter only once per wordThey score points for each word as follows:minimum 3 letters =1 4 letters = 25 letters= 36 letters = 47+ = ? (bonus ie make it up as you go along)After students swap papers shout out some answers and you write them down saying yes or no (half of them will have the same words anyway)….get them to add the scores up. You might also make a mental note of the longer words and teach them as random vocab. ”

from user LDMA at http://www.ajarnforum.net/

    Hangman is of very dubious pedagogical value IMHO, it uses an inordinate amount of time to focus on single words.

    Far better is Board Boggle in which you draw a 5x5 grid on the board with letters ellicited from students (be sure to be tactical and abitrarily stick a few vowels in there) or you can make your own up if time is short.

    In 2’s-3’s Students have 10-15 minutes to find as many words as they can…

    Words can be found in the grid by following chains in any direction vertically. horizontally or diagonally, using each letter only once per word

    They score points for each word as follows:
    minimum 3 letters =1 
    4 letters = 2
    5 letters= 3
    6 letters = 4
    7+ = ? (bonus ie make it up as you go along)

    After students swap papers shout out some answers and you write them down saying yes or no (half of them will have the same words anyway)….get them to add the scores up. 

    You might also make a mental note of the longer words and teach them as random vocab. ”

    from user LDMA at http://www.ajarnforum.net/

     
  6. Ongoing compilation of user-submitted games for EFL/ESL.  Descriptions about games, English level, and materials needed.  

     
  7. anki is a powerful flashcard tool that reviews facts/vocab/whatever you want to memorize on a schedule.  Facts you find easier are reviewed less frequently.  Facts you find more difficult are reviewed more frequently.  It’s free for mac or PC (donations accepted) but costs something like 20 USD for the iOS app.  It’s AWESOME!

    anki is a powerful flashcard tool that reviews facts/vocab/whatever you want to memorize on a schedule.  Facts you find easier are reviewed less frequently.  Facts you find more difficult are reviewed more frequently.  It’s free for mac or PC (donations accepted) but costs something like 20 USD for the iOS app.  It’s AWESOME!

     
  8. This guy’s trying to learn a language every year.  Here are his thoughts on twitter as a language learning tool.  Any thoughts on using QQ and weibo for Chinese ELLs? 

     
  9. Just chock-full of great free resources, including links to free language lessons, free courses, free textbooks and much, much more.  Unbelievable.

     
  10. No frills, just really nice leveled materials for EFL students.  They have a decent collection of well-organized short stories from VOA special English.

    Web Site Description

    This web site is for people studying English as a Second Language (ESL) or English as a Foreign Language (EFL). There are quizzes, word games, word puzzles, proverbs, slang expressions, anagrams, a random-sentence generator and other computer assisted language learning activities. Even though the primary focus is for ESL, native English speakers may also find some interesting things on this site. This site is non-commercial and has no advertising. TESL/TEFL teachers may want to recommend this site to their students.